Predicting Weather by the Signs: Wooly Worms, 2018

Here in the Southern mountains, the old-timers (and many young people as well) still predict the weather by “the signs,” that is, the signs found in nature.  One of those signs is the coloration of the wooly worms. Wooly worms, also known as wooly bears, are found across the U.S., Canada, and Mexico and are…

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Places People Live

At the beach   In the Upper Midwest   In Southern Appalachia “There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.”  (Jane Austen)   See more places people live or join Cee’s challenge here.

Pic and a Word Challenge: Peaks

Blue Ridge Mountain peaks, as seen from an overlook somewhere on the highway between Dillard, Georgia and Highlands, North Carolina “The mountains are calling and I must go.” (John Muir)   This challenge is a new one to me, as I was just introduced to Pix to Words who sponsors it each week.  It looks…

Appalachian Sayings: “Eat up with”

“Eat up with,” short for “eaten up with,” can mean either consumed by or covered up with. Here in Appalachia, a person can be “eat up with” or consumed by a negative emotion but not a positive one.  No one is ever eat up with love or kindness or compassion, but a person can be…

Appalachian Sayings: “Nary a one”

I often use this phrase.  In Appalachia, “nary a one” means none, not one, none at all. This year, although the wild dogwood trees in the woods around us burst out in beautiful blooms, the three trees in our back garden had no blooms, nary a one. Likewise, although I have enjoyed seeing the photos…