Happy Veterans Day to my dad and all who have served

Today, Americans are celebrating Veterans Day and honoring all who have served in the U.S. military.  The date November 11 marked the end of World War I in 1918, and people in many countries honor the day as Remembrance Day or Armistice Day, remembering those who fought in that Great War.  In the U.S., in 1954…

A Photo a Week Challenge: In Memoriam

From my archives, a photo of the tomb of one of America’s most renowned baseball players, Ty Cobb (1886-1961), taken at Rose Hill Cemetery in the little town of Royston, Georgia. And under a nearby tree, the headstone of my great grandmother, Lillie Westmoreland Dorough. Growing up in Royston, she knew Ty Cobb and often…

An interesting find. What is it?

Last month when grandson Ben came for a socially-distanced porch visit, he brought an artifact he had found, hoping I could identify it for him. He found it in a creek near his home. It’s very heavy, apparently made of iron, appears to have had handles although one is now missing, is hollowed out on…

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: W.E.B. Du Bois

The first African American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard, W.E.B. Du Bois (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was a sociologist, historian, civil rights activist, author, writer, and editor. He was the leader of the Niagara Movement which sought equal rights for African Americans and was a founder of the NAACP (National Association…

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Edith Wharton

The first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937) was an American novelist, playwright, short story writer, and designer. In addition to 15 novels, seven novellas, and eighty-five short stories, she published poetry, books on design and travel, literary and cultural criticism, and a memoir….

Monday Memories: Sydney Opera House under construction, 1970

Construction of the iconic Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia began in 1959 and was not completed until 14 years later in 1973. When I was there in 1970, residents of Sydney were complaining not only about the time it was taking to complete construction but also about the total cost. Click here for some…

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Abraham Heschel

A Polish-born American rabbi, Abraham Joshua Heschel (January 11, 1907 – December 23, 1972)  was a leading 20th century Jewish theologian and philosopher. He was a professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, was active in the civil rights movement in the U.S., and authored a number of books on Jewish philosophy that were widely…

Monday Memories: Palace of Westminster at dusk, 1978

I’m in the process of digitizing old photos and slides and thought I’d share a few from time to time. This photo of the Palace of Westminster in London was taken during our honeymoon, 42 years ago this month. (And yes, it is inverted.)

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Eleanor Roosevelt

Most people know Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) as First Lady of the United States, a political figure in her own right, a diplomat, and an activist in the areas of civil rights, women’s rights, and the rights of World War II refugees. However, few people today remember that she also…