What I Found On My Walk Down the Road: Joe Pye Weed

It’s everywhere here and attracts butterflies like a magnet.  A flowering plant in the sunflower family, Joe Pye Weed is native to the eastern United States and Canada. But who was Joe Pye anyway?  The plant is reported to have been named for Jopi (pronounced Joe Pye), a  Native American healer who used the plant…

Now Blooming In My Corner of North Georgia: Black-Eyed Susan

All in the Downs the fleet was moor’d,  The streamers waving in the wind,  When black-eyed Susan came aboard;  ‘O! where shall I my true-love find?  Tell me, ye jovial sailors, tell me true  If my sweet William sails among the crew.’ “Black-eyed Susan” by John Gay  Black-eyed Susan, or Rudbeckia, also is known as Brown-Eyed…

Finally blooming in my corner of North Georgia: Black Eyed Susan

Native to the central United States, Black Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) can be found throughout North America in gardens and parks. According to traditional medicine, the roots can be used to stimulate the immune system. The Ojibwa tribe used the roots as a poultice for snake bites and for treating colds and worms in children.  The Menominee and Potawatomi tribes used the plant as…